How USAA sees occupations in 2010

Now that USAA has opened up its banking products to non-military types, I’m in process of moving our checking and savings accounts over there (refunded ATM charges, good bill pay, free checks, convenient deposits, etc.). So in setting up my profile I was prompted to select an occupation from a pull-down menu. The list of occupations (359 of them) that USAA believes one might be engaged in is pretty good.

Best of it is they have “Dancer” as well as “Dancer (exotic)” and “Dancer (oth exotic)” – not sure which strippers see themselves as “other”.

Yet for myself I guess the right category is “Cmptr related prof”, which I take to mean “Computer related profession”, which I take to mean that USAA sees everybody who has an occupation related to computers as a single type of person whereas there is a great distinction between “Writer” and “Poet”.

The full list:

Accountant
Actor
Actuary
Administrative assistant
Administrative specialist
Administrator
Advertising
Aircraft Maintenance
Analyst (except systems)
Analyst/researcher
Anchorman
Anesthesiologist
Appliance repair
Appraiser
Architect
Artist
Assayer
Astronomer
Attorney general
Attorney/lawyer
Audiologist
Auditor
Bail bondsman
Bailiff
Baker
Bank/fin/invest
Barber
Bartender
Beautician
Bio-chemist
Biologist
Bookkeeper
Botanist
Brick layer
Broadcaster, radio/tv
Building contractor
Bursar
Business executive
Butcher
Buyer
Camera operator
Carpenter
Carpet/floor installer
Cartographer
Case worker
Certified accountant
Certified financial planner
Certified Financial Planner
Certified public accountant
Chef
Chemist
Chief executive officer
Chief financial officer
Chief operating officer
Child care provider
Chiropodist
Chiropractor
Civil servant
Claims adjuster
Clergyman
Clerical/secretary
Clerk
Cmptr related prof
Coach
College instructor
Columnist
Commentator
Company officer
Composer
Comptroller
Congressman
Conservationist
Construction worker
Consultant
Consultant (business)
Consultant (software)
Consultant (tax)
Contractor (other)
Controller
Copy editor
Correctional officer
Cosmetologist
Councilman
Counselor
Counselor-at-law
County commissioner
Courier
Creative arts
Crew member (aircraft)
Crew member (other)
Cryptographer
Curator
Custodian
Customer service
Dancer
Dancer (exotic)
Dancer (oth exotic)
Data entry
Data processor
Day care worker
Dean
Dental hygienist
Dental surgeon
Dentist
Dermatologist
Designer
Dietician
Director
Disc jockey
Dispatcher
District attorney
Doctor
Draftsman
Driller
Driver
Economist
Editor
Education administration
Educator
Electrician
Electronic technician
Endodontist
Engineer
Engraver
Entomologist
Environ researcher
Ethnologist
Examiner (financial)
Executive
Executive assistant
Farmer
FBI agent
Federal agent
Film
Film Crew
Financial examiner
Fireman
Flight attendant
Flight instr (civ)
Flight instr (mil)
Florist
Food scientist
Forester
Formsetter
Furniture maker
General manager
Geologist
Geophysicist
Geriatrician
Gerontologist
Governor
Graduate assistant
Graphic designer
Greenskeeper
Gynecologist
Hairdresser
Head resident
Historian
Homemaker
Housekeeper
Hygienist
Illustrator
Importer/exporter
Information specialist
Ins sls/agnt/brkr
Instructor
Intelligence officer
Interior designer
Intern
Internist
Interpreter
Interviewer
Inventor
Inventory
Investor
IRS agent
Jeweler
Journalist
Judge
Juvenile probation officer
Key punch operator
Landscape architect
Landscaper
Law enforcement
Lawyer
Lecturer
Legal assistant
Librarian
Licensed vocational nurse(lvn)
Linguist
Loan officer
Locksmith
Logger
Machinist
Maintenance worker
Manager
Manager trainee
Manual laborer
Manufacturing representative
Marine biologist
Marketing
Mason
Mathematician
Mechanic
Med sup/health
Media specialist
Medical doctor
Metallurgist
Meteorologist
Micro-biologist
Military enlisted
Military officer
Miner
Mineralogist
Mortgage broker
Mortician
Music director
Musician
Naturalist
Network administrator
Neurologist
News reporter
None
Nurse
Nurse practitioner
Obstetrician
Occup therapist
Oceanographer
Oculist
Office administrator
Office manager
Office worker
Ophthalmologist
Optician
Optometrist
Oral surgeon
Orthodontist
Osteopath
Otologist
Painter
Paleontologist
Paralegal
Paramedic
Park Ranger
Partner
Pathologist
PBX
Pediatrician
Periodontist
Personal trainer
Pharmacist
Photographer
Physical therapist
Physician
Physician assistant
Physicist
Pilot
Planner
Plant manager
Plastic surgeon
Plumber
Podiatrist
Poet
Politician
Postal worker
Preacher
Principal
Printer
Probation officer
Procurement officer
Producer/director
Product manager
Professional athlete
Professor
Programmer
Project manager
Property manager
Proprietor
Prosecutor
Psychiatrist
Psychologist
Public relations
Purchasing agent
Radar technician
Radiodontist
Radiologist
Receptionist
Recreational worker
Recruiter
Refused
Regional manager
Registered nurse
Research scientist
Researcher
Resident
Retired
Rl est sls/agnt/brkr
Roofer
Sailor
Sales manager
Sales retail/mkt rep
Sanitation worker
School administrator
School president
Scientist
Sculptor
Seamstress
Secret service agent
Secretary
Secretary-treasurer
Security guard
Sheet metal worker
Singer
Skilled laborer
Social worker
Sound technician
Speech pathologist
Sports professional
Staff judge advocate
Stagecraft technician
Statistician
Steeple jack
Stenographer
Stock broker
Student
Superintendent
Supervisor
Supply manager
Supply technician
Surgeon
Surveyor
Systems analyst
Tailor
Tax consultant
Teacher
Technician
Telephone Operator
Teller
Theater
Therapist (health)
Tool maker
Trainer
Treasurer
Trust officer
Tutor
Typist
Undertaker
Underwriter
Upholsterer
Urologist
Veterinarian
Videographer
Waiter/waitress
Welder
Wholesaler
Woodsman
Writer
Youth worker
Zoologist

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One Response to “How USAA sees occupations in 2010”

  1. TCL says:

    I see you as more of an “Information Specialist” myself.

    Funny the range — from wildly general (“Company officer,” “Partner,” “Supervisor”) to nuttily specific, your example being the best, but also “Staff judge advocate” (presumably a remnant of the former military focus).

    Also amusing: Steeplejack, Assayer. I know they’re real jobs. But perhaps the most fun to say at a party: “Me? I’m an assayer.”

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